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I didn't move for a while and pretended to be asleep while I gently squeezed him.

This death made us realize the seriousness of the situation.

We were sentenced to die from hunger, cold, vermin, and illness without succor, mercy, or any other resources except our faith, youth, and our ability to endure and fill time.1Introduction This article analyzes the "hidden transcript"2 of resistance in Moroccan prison writings through an examination of the memoirs of two Moroccan army officers,3 Ahmed Marzouki and Aziz Bine Bine.

I’d dart across a few busy intersections, sweat through my shirt and stain my shoes with red dust. There was no dust, no palpable energy, no overwhelming signs that life is unfolding all around me.

I’d smile at the woman who operates a small roadside fruit stand, and nod (I’m friendly, not all out outgoing, people. Getting groceries had turned back into the chore it’d always been for me in the U. I had lived in Nairobi for just over a year, and I had loved it.

I’d often walk to the grocery store when I lived in Nairobi — by choice, since I could have easily hopped in a matatu, a minibus system that transports you most anywhere you need to go in that buzzing city.

Instead — the handles of my reusable grocery bags painfully digging into my shoulders — I’d hoof it all the way there and home again. — briefly to Iowa, of all places (never, ever again) — I remember feeling empty when I’d drive to the local Shnuck’s.

Drawing on Irving Goffman's analysis of the functions of "total insti- tutions"5 and Michel Foucault's seminal work Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison,6 this article explores how Tazmamart captives resisted prison conditions, discipline, docility, and authority through their writings.

James Scott's notion of "hidden transcript," which describes "discourse that takes place "offstage" beyond direct observation by powerholders,"7 is especially useful in revealing "the disguised, low-profile, undeclared resistance"8 that took place in Tazmamart during the "years of lead." By applying Scott's theory to Marzouki's prison memoir, Tazmamart Cell 10,9 and Bine Bine's Tazmamort: Eighteen Years in the Jail of Hassan II, which portray the detention experiences of the two authors in the secret detention camp of Tazmamart in the period between 19, I will elucidate these everyday forms of resistance to discipline and prison authority, and demonstrate how survival was part and parcel of resisting this authority, while recognizing its cultural and political implications for the larger Moroccan society.

The adventure I'm about to describe happened in spring 2000 when Jon had to go to Morocco on a business trip.

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